GROTESQUE ELEMENTS IN TWO SELECTED SHORT STORIES

  • HANA HAGHIGHI UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA
  • ROSLI TALIF UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA
Keywords: alienation, Bram Stoker, grotesque, Sadegh Hedayat, The Cursed Citadel, The Judge’s House

Abstract

This study aims to identify and analyse grotesque elements in two selected short stories: The Judge’s House by Bram Stoker (1847–1912), an Irish writer, and The Cursed Citadel by an Iranian writer, Sadegh Hedayat (1903-1951). Pertaining to two different cultures with different backgrounds, the selected stories include several grotesque elements in both their structures and subject matters. The grotesque elements in the selected short stories are manifested through literary devices including characters, plots, atmosphere, and style. The characters of both stories are depicted as irregular as well as extravagant creatures and the plots are teemed with strangeness and abnormalcy representing distorted reflection of known familiar places and parodies of human qualities. These elements disable the characters and provide a fragmented and alienated perception of the world. Retaining the features of the grotesque genre along with attempting to symbolize the ugly reality through illustrating atrocity and cruelty in the world, both authors take familiar ordinary things and deform them in both content and form. As a result, there is an element of truth in images, situations, characters, and events despite their entirely exaggerated representation.

References

Barasch, F. K. (1971). Grotesque in art. Hawthorne: Mouton.
Bloom, H., & Hobby, B. (2009). The grotesque. New York: Infobase Publishing.
Claybrough, A. (1965). The grotesque in English literature. London: Clarendon Press.
Corey, Susan. (1997). The grotesque in Tonni Morrison’s beloves. In J.L. Adams, W.
Yates & R. P. Warren (Eds.), The Grotesque in art and literature: Theological
reflections. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing.
Hedayat, S. (1959). Trois gout de sang et six autres nouvelles. Tehran: Keyhan
Publication.
Kayser, W. J. (1963). The grotesque in art and literature. New York: Columbia
University Press.
McElroy, B. (1987). Fiction of the modern grotesque. New York: Macmillan.
Thomson, P. (1972). The grotesque: The critical idiom. London: Methuen.
Stoker, B. (2006). The dracula guest and other weird stories. London: Penguin Books
Limited.
Published
2014-09-30